Our Capitol Hill Renter Initiative

 

Since March 22, the Capitol Hill Renter Initiative has steadily gathered momentum, growing from 25 renters at our first meeting to a mailing list of 132 today. And Seattle is taking notice.

We have made our voices heard, testifying in front of City Council in support of the Housing Affordability and Livability Agenda (HALA), Mandatory Housing Affordability (MHA), the Seattle Comprehensive Plan Update (Seattle 2035), and the Carl Haglund Law. We have written letters to the City Council and met with some of them in person, including Councilmember Sawant at the Gearshift Community Forum and Councilmember Gonzalez at the June meeting of the Renter Initiative. Hours after partnering with the Mayor to announce the City’s break with the District Council system, Kathy Nyland—Director of Seattle’s Department of Neighborhoods—sat down with about 40 of us to discuss how the City could reform its community engagement program in order to give renters and other underrepresented communities greater access to local policy discussions.

July Renter Initiative Meeting with Kathy Nyland, Director of the Department of Neighborhoods

July Renter Initiative Meeting with Kathy Nyland, Director of the Department of Neighborhoods

The Renter Initiative Facebook page has been a great community building forum, with members discussing posted articles and videos, organizing and sharing events such as monthly meetings and community outreach opportunities.  On September 24, we will hold Capitol Hill’s first Renter Summit (RSVP now!), bringing together renters from 100 different buildings across our neighborhood to exchange ideas, refine and organize behind a collective political voice, and build a set of policy recommendations that renters can continue to rally behind as the City moves forward in its pursuit of affordability and livability.

According to figures from the most recent Census data, renters make up a majority of Seattle residents and over 80 percent of people living on Capitol Hill.  However, if an outsider were to look at the demographic profile of the current participants in Seattle’s debate around affordable housing, they would most likely guess otherwise. To have any sort of successful discussion and debate on HALA and MHA, we as a city must make sure that the people affected by rising rents are central to the conversation.

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