Category: Waste and Recycling

Capitol Hill Garage Sale and Farmers Market THIS SUNDAY

Grab some coffee and a pastry, then hit the ATM on Sunday morning. You’ll want cash in your pocket and perhaps a map (download here or pick one up in the Park) for all the garage and yard sales happening in Cal Anderson Park and across the neighborhood.

It’s time again for the Capitol Hill Garage Sale and this year it’s going to be huge with more than 100 registered sellers! About half will be selling items in Cal Anderson Park and another 50+ will be laying out their wares on lawns, by sidewalks, and in front of their homes. We suggest you start in the Park where a DJ will be spinning AND the Capitol Hill Tool Library will have a booth.

Oh yeah, you’ll also want to bring your dull knives. The Tool Library will be where you can get your dull knives and tools sharpened for FREE. There also will be folks in the tents with info on how to support Cal Anderson Park, get engaged with fellow renter activists, and join the work of the Capitol Hill EcoDistrict  to make our neighborhood safer, greener and more equitable.

When you’re done popping tags, you’ll probably be hungry again. Head from the Garage Sale to the Capitol Hill Farmers Market. If you haven’t been to the Market in a while, it’s peak season for peaches, nectarines, melons, tomatoes, peppers, and all that the summer has to offer! While you’re there, make sure to say ‘hi’ to Leah Litwak, the new manager of the Market. She’s a great addition to the community and eager to meet neighbors.

Finally, we want to say a huge thank you to all of the sponsors that are making this even possible: Capitol Hill HousingAIDS Healthcare FoundationSchemata Workshop, Hunters CapitalBoard and Vellum, and Recology CleanScapes. An extra special thanks to Capitol Hill Seattle Blog for nurturing this incredible neighborhood tradition over the years.

See you out there!

The “8th ANNUAL CAPITOL HILL GARAGE SALE DAY” will take place on Sunday, August 27th, starting at 10:00 a.m. throughout the heart of Capitol Hill and in Cal Anderson Park. Individuals without a garage or front yard can sign up for table space in Cal Anderson park. A $10 donation to the Cal Anderson Park Alliance secures a spot. For more information or a map, go to capitolhillgaragesale.com. Printed maps will also be available on August 27th at the information table in Cal Anderson Park. Follow along on social media: #NoGarageNoProblem2017 or become a fan on Facebook: @CalAndersonPark.

Diving into the Dumpster Problem on Capitol Hill: Part 2 of 2

dumpstersHere it is, the long anticipated part deux of 2 posts on dumpsters. Back in March I posted a copy of the report we produced with funding through the Office of Economic Development where you can read the 15 mitigation strategies we offered to the City for consideration.

The City considered our recommendations and then decided to ignore most of them. The good news, they are moving forward with a plan to address the problem.

Seattle Public Utilities (SPU) is leading the implementation of a very hands-on program that includes “reviewing polices on storing trash and recycling in the right-of-way and performing site reviews of businesses that have dumpsters stored on streets and sidewalks, with the goal of removing all dumpsters and carts from the right of way.”

In April, SPU began reaching out to impacted businesses to review alternative solid waste service options and costs. The utility is providing information on solid waste service types as well as recycle and compost service information and education.

We support SPU’s very high-touch approach. Each business has unique site characteristics that makes a one-size-fits-all solution untenable.

We also plan to stay connected to the implementation process. Capitol Hill Housing is partnering with the Capitol Hill Chamber’s Clean and Safe Committee to monitor SPU’s progress and participate in a six-month evaluation to see just how many dumpsters and totes are removed. We also will help develop a follow up strategy to the City’s outreach and education effort.

Thinking Outside of the Bin: Seattle Food Rescue & Capitol Hill Housing Team Up

Walking through your local grocery store at the end of the day, have you ever wondered what they do with all the food that didn’t sell? The sad truth is that most of it will be discarded. Americans throw away 37 million tons of food each year, nearly 1/3 of what is produced.

That is the kind of needless waste that Seattle Food Rescue (SFR) aims to prevent.Seattle Food Rescue

A completely volunteer-run organization, Seattle Food Rescue partners with local grocery stores to get those perfectly good, about-to-expire sandwiches, salads and produce into the hands of hungry, homeless and low-income Seattle residents. The best part? They do it all on bikes, reducing the environmental footprint of transporting the goods.

Until recently, SFR used a “hub and spoke” model, delivering to community organizations like food banks who would then distribute the food to individuals. But a new partnership with Capitol Hill Housing (CHH) has afforded an opportunity to pilot a direct distribution system.  Approximately twice a week, SFR volunteers haul a load of packaged perishable food and fresh produce on their bikes straight to the front door of three CHH buildings with particularly low-income residents.

SFR founder Tim Jenkins explained that the benefits of this model are numerous:
“In addition to building a sense of community, there are logistical benefits,” he shared.

Whereas at a food bank, goods near the end of their shelf life may sit for an additional day or two, direct delivery ensures that the food gets consumed immediately. Furthermore, donors enjoy the idea that they are supporting their own neighborhoods, and since the food is from nearby, the options are more likely to be culturally appropriate for the recipients.  As Jenkins put it, “We wanted to make [our service] a little more personal and keep it even more local than at the zip code level.”

CHH and its residents are thrilled. Elliot Swanson, CHH Resident Services Manager, noted that low-income residents often eat highly processed foods, since they usually provide more caloric “bang for your buck”—an important consideration for poor families,
who on average already spend almost a third of their income on food. The fresh foods delivered by SFR fill a nutritional gap left by other hunger relief organizations that rely on shelf-stable but more processed foods.

food_waste_headerBased on the overwhelmingly positive feedback from residents, both Jenkins and Swanson would like to see this pilot program expand to more CHH buildings. Eventually Swanson would
even like to coordinate cooking classes for residents, helping them to make the best use of the fresh produce.

Reducing waste, getting resources to people in need, using sustainable transportation, and  building community—Seattle Food Rescue offers a surprisingly simple solution to some of this city’s most pressing priorities.

If you’d like to get involved with the Seattle Food Rescue, email them at seattlefoodrescue@gmail.com.